Chain & Rake Monster Featured in Canadian Broadcasting Story About Wipes and Sewer Debris

Chain & Rake Monster

Sewer professional Barry Orr of the sewer association MESUG views a JWC Chain & Rake Monster to see rags and wipes screened out of the wastewater.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto does a great job interviewing Canadian sewer professionals for a news report about their struggles with mountains of sewer debris. You can actually see several of JWC’s Chain & Rake Monster screens during the TV report. The Durham Regional Council uses Chain & Rake Monster bar screens and Screenings Washer Monster compactors at several of their treatment plants.

The fearless CBC reporter Lorenda Reddekopp actually climbs into a dumpster full of screenings (still steaming after just being removed from the sewers and processed) to get a look at all the trash and debris people flush down their toilets. The screenings actually look pretty clean – that’s because the Screenings Washer Monster puts the rags and wipes through a six stage cleaning process – grind, wash, screen, wash again, compact and dewater.  The cleaned screenings are then dropped into the dumpsters shown in this TV interview.

“Toilets are not garbage cans,” said Barry Orr, from the municipal enforcement sewer use group. “This material should be going into the garbage can. It makes a big difference on our waste water system, on our tax dollars and on our environment too.”

 

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